Ghazal of Trees

I marvel at the strength and grace
of the green sinewy limbs of trees.

There’s a frisson of surprise and joy
when a flock of birds explodes from trees.

I’m hypnotised by the dance of shadow
and light when evening thrills through trees.

My imagination takes flight when I see
silhouettes of storm-blasted trees.

I dance among falling leaves
in fields crowned with gold and copper trees.

I rejoice in the vibrant colours
of profusely berried winter trees.

How can one not admire the artistry
of ivy and mistletoe embellished trees?

I fill my lungs with the intoxicating scent
of ancient and decaying trees.

I listen on a winter’s night to wind
in branches and crackling frost in trees.

But oh, I mourn the loss of forests,
the robbery of Earth’s wealth of trees.

I dread the day when I can’t hear
a breeze whispering the ghazal of trees.

Kim M. Russell, 30th May 2019

Winding

Another ghazal for dVerse Poets Pub Open Link Night

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52 thoughts on “Ghazal of Trees

  1. A wonderful poem about trees. You may be interested in my Sunday Muse BlogSpot Wednesday addition. The prompt is about shinrin yoku – forest healing. This poem is perfect for it. I love trees. They are my favorite being on earth and this poem tells of them so well. I like the gazal of trees. Lovely line that is

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  2. Hey, this is the finest Ghazal I’ve ever read. It works incredibly well, eclipses the stogy form and sings its own song; makes me anxious to write another Ghazal. You inspire me.

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  3. Oh you’ve set this up so beautifully…..all those ways to appreciate and feel and hear and sense the wonder of trees…….and then the fear that they are being plundered. Well done.

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  4. A beautiful poem for the trees Kim. Your words ‘But oh, I mourn the loss of forests,
    the robbery of Earth’s wealth of trees.

    I dread the day when I can’t hear
    a breeze whispering the ghazal of trees’

    are especially poignant at this time when so many ancient trees are felled in the Highlands to make way for hydro schemes

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I didn’t realise they were cutting down ancient trees, Xenia. That’s terrible! I did read about the famous ancient tree that’s been killed by tourists. People just don’t understand how valuable trees are. I know that we have to find alternative sources of energy and power , but they are removing Earth’s lungs in the process.

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  5. My goodness this is beautiful! ❤️ There is so much to love in this Ghazal especially; “I’m hypnotised by the dance of shadow and light when evening thrills through trees,” and oh “How can one not admire the artistry of ivy and mistletoe embellished trees?” Love it, Kim! 😀

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    1. I love trees, Sanaa, and can’t imagine a world without them – we couldn’t exist without them. That’s one of the reason I will find it hard to move closer to my daughter, I don’t want to leave behind our garden with its lovely trees. 🙂

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  6. What a glorious celebration of trees, Kim!

    Have you read Overstory? You must have done.

    I love the beauty you find in the different seasons, and I share your fear. There have been diseases in pines down here, so lots of pine trees cut down prematurely to protect their value. Ash die-back is spreading. We are losing horse chestnuts – such a beautiful tree. And I can remember Dutch elm disease, of course. what will be left?

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    1. Thank you so much, Sarah. Yes, I’ve read The Overstory and loved it. Norfolk woods and forests seem to be quite healthy at the moment, but I know that isn’t the case in other parts of the country – and the world. The trees in our garden look after themselves, although we had to let the electricity people cut branches off our willow and a few other trees that were tangled in their cables. Luckily the willow is growing back – it always does. I’m looking out at the garden and drinking in the dappled sunlight and the greenness of it all!

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  7. I hope I can always hear the songs of the trees. I wonder will the weeping willow be alone to weep for her extended family. I always smile when I see a flock of birds explode from trees, my eyes always follow them to their next destination.

    There’s a frisson of surprise and joy
    when a flock of birds explodes from trees.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. I love to write shout trees, so this captivated me immediately Kim. This is wonderful and engaging! I share your horror over the plight of trees. We are so dependent on them, but so shortsighted as stewards of these amazing treasures. Great piece!

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  9. As a fellow tree hugger, I am in awe of this. Beautifully penned and I love the way you end with “trees” in each couplet. Reading this aloud was a poetic treat! My neighbour behind me cut down every tree in his yard. I was so disgusted and sad watching it.

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  10. Your ghazal mimics the growth rings of the trees, each singing a beautiful song of perseverance, majesty, and grace. We should revere them for their contribution to our physical, emotional, and spiritual health.

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    1. Thanks Kerfe. Right now I’m entranced by the early morning sun glinting through the silver birches at the end of the garden and listening to the birds – so many different sounds.

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  11. So gorgeous ..you took me through the seasons, sights, smells, emotional responses to all the trees and tied it together with man’s innate connection to trees..we are so alike in so many ways. For as long as man has lived on earth, each of us has bonded with at least one tree, one that became a friend, a place to read, eat an apple, contemplate how the universe is formed, note the angles in the limbs, the parallel lines only to be surprised in geometry that all those things had names, and had been noted before. I think you’ve truly told a love story here!

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  12. Well Kim, I am a lover of nature, specially trees. May we always be serenaded by the trees.

    Your last couplet was outstanding:
    I dread the day when I can’t hear
    a breeze whispering the ghazal of trees.

    Liked by 1 person

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