A Serpent’s Tale

This month in Visual Verse: An Anthology of Art and Words, we have an unusual image by an unknown artist from the Wellcome Collection, which has inspired a wealth of strange tales and poetry. I look forward, on the first of every month, to the Visual Verse challenge of one image, one hour, 50-500 words. You can peruse the whole issue and find my poem on page 26 or you can go directly to ‘A Serpent’s Tale‘. 

Linked to dVerse Poets Pub Open link Night.

41 thoughts on “A Serpent’s Tale

  1. The rhyme scheme and illustration give the poem a classic feel, where form is essential. Tis a sweet tale, worthy of fable or fairy tale status.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. A beautiful write, like others before me said, worthy of classic fairy-tale status, with a gentle yet measured rhythm and rhyme, with a universal message of empathy and sharing to boot! A truly wonderful read. Thanks for sharing. ~peace, Jason

    Liked by 1 person

  3. charming character and a poem filled with depth. these lines are wise:
    The adults couldn’t understand
    how an innocent gesture broke
    the spell, how empathy spoke
    a language, child to beast,
    with the sharing of a simple feast.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. This is so beautiful and heartfelt. Serpents often do get a bad rep and you redeem them in idea and spirit by allowing them to be accepted—all in the roots of compassion. Loved how it was brought from the innocence of a child; there’s a certain beauty in that, how children can be more open than adults.

    Such beautiful writing, and yes, quite an unusual but inspiring image to write to. Congratulations on the publication, it truly is an amazing piece.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. The image is interesting, and I really like your poem. We should all make note of this:

    “The adults couldn’t understand
    how an innocent gesture broke
    the spell, how empathy spoke
    a language, child to beast,
    with the sharing of a simple feast.”

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I saw the hint of amour in your amoury which we call armory in the U.S. I love the taming gesture of the child and I think that wisdom will stay with me.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. A lovely tale, Kim, with beautiful rhymes, images and of course, a very important message not to pass judgement on something you don’t understand, the idea of acceptance so well illustrated. Thank you for sharing this and a sumptuous feast of other poems! Yum! 😀

    Liked by 1 person

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