Childhood Goblins

Towers, chimneys and rooftops
disintegrate in a colourwash
of sunset and night’s ink drops
spill into puddles of dreams,
when children hear the goblins cry:
“Come buy our fruits, come buy, come buy!”

Curious thoughts enter little heads
that lie in comfort on soft pillows,
invade the safety of their beds,
pull at the quilts, remove the covers
and fill their ears with whispering:
“Come buy our fruits,” sigh the goblins.

They peddle apples, pears and cherries
oranges, lemons and raspberries,
cranberries, blackberries, strawberries
and fuzzy peaches that run with juice.
They say their grapes are fresh from the vine
and their pomegranates are full and fine.

But clever children don’t buy their fruits
or look at wicked merchant goblins
who feed their thirsty fruit tree roots
with the blood of children that they took;
they are poisonous to a human child
and their magic makes you bad and wild.

When night pours puddles on the town
and mother has tucked you up in bed
under your feather eiderdown,
if you should hear the goblins cry:
“Come buy our fruits, come buy, come buy!”
pull up the covers and close your eyes.

Kim M. Russell, 2017

Goblin Market.png

Image found on Pinterest

My response to Imaginary Garden with Real Toads Fashion Me Your Words ~ The way you see it

Gillena is our host today. She has asked us to choose a poem, look upon it with a fresh view and write a new poem based on the way it triggers a response after this reading. (We should not post the poem we have chosen on our blog but add a reference link only, if there is one, or mention it in a process note.)  I have chosen a poem I liked as a child but now find quite twee and far too long: ‘Goblin Market’ by Christina Rossetti.

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20 thoughts on “Childhood Goblins

  1. But clever children don’t buy their fruits
    or look at wicked merchant goblins
    who feed their thirsty fruit tree roots
    with the blood of children that they took..

    This seems far more apt, a cautionary tale, what with all the predators out there.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Ooh I absolutely adore this! 😀 Such a charming rendition of the original poem, Kim!❤️ Especially love; “When night pours puddles on the town and mother has tucked you up in bed under your feather eiderdown, if you should hear the goblins cry:“Come buy our fruits, come buy, come buy!” pull up the covers and close your eyes.”❤️

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Little did we know as children how huge those goblins would loom. Or is it that parents have grown up with that music in their heads, and rushed to protect their children from dread? Maybe both. Anyway, fine turn of the poem.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Tried entering my comment using my phone. It should have appeared by now, so i know it was an unsuccessful attempt.
    Okay so Thanks for participating.
    I luv the image you painted with your words. Luv the story-telling mode, the caution to children in today’s World of [so many fresh new woes]. And when i skipped over to read the poem which steered you to this new inspired piece, i was absorbed in a treat of enchantment and intrigue. I couldn’t stop reading until i got to the very last word, Wow!!!

    Have a nice Sunday

    much love…

    Liked by 1 person

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