A Few Clerihew

John Donne

Was a dirty old man

Who likened fondling and seduction

To New World exploration

 

John Milton

Was a glutton for Stilton

Nightmares from cheese on toast

Resulted in Paradise Lost

 

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Couldn’t stop frowning

Like many lady Victorians

She was hooked on laudanum

 

© Kim M. Russell, 2016

My response to dVerse Poets Pub Form For All; the Clerihew

Gayle from Bodhirose’s Blog is our host this evening for Form-For-All/Meeting the Bar and she has invited us to play with humour and couplets in a form called a Clerihew: comic verse on biographical topics consisting of two couplets and a specific rhyming scheme of aabb that was invented by Edmund Clerihew Bentley, an English novelist and humorist.   The poem deals with a person or character in the first line.  In most cases, the first line names a celebrity or well-known person and the second line rhymes with the name of the person.

Here are two of the more popular Clerihew that Bentley wrote as examples:

Sir Humphrey Davy
Abominated gravy.
He lived in the odium
Of having discovered sodium.

Sir Christopher Wren
Said, “I am going to dine with some men.
If anyone calls
Say I am designing St. Paul’s.”


 

Advertisements

33 thoughts on “A Few Clerihew

    1. Thanks Gayle. I’m back from the hospital and my eyes are just beginning to get back to normal again. Luckily I don’t have to go back. I just have to use the Amsler grid to make sure nothing untoward is happening.

      Like

  1. You really got into the limerick mode, & the results are great fun. Clerihews feel/sound/look a lot like limericks to me. I applaud your almost rhyming, pushing us outside the conventional.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s